Keys to Choosing a Chicago Real Estate Lawyer

February 24, 2011 by Barry Real Estate 

Keys to Choosing a Chicago Real Estate Lawyer

Finding the right Chicago real estate attorney can have a significant impact on the success or failure of your real estate transaction whether the transaction you are involved in is residential or commercial. It is a challenge to find a lawyer you connect with among the sea of real estate attorneys who market their services in the Yellow Pages and on the Internet. Below are three qualifications you should look for when you are searching for a Chicago real estate lawyer. While there is no guarantee that using these 3 things will guarantee finding a successful Chicago real estate attorney, asking these questions can help you ensure that you choose the best possible real estate attorney for your case.

Question 1: How Long Have You Been a Chicago Real Estate Lawyer?

This is among the most basic questions for you to ask your potential lawyer, yet a surprising number of potential clients forget to ask it. Virtually every attorney chooses one specialty to follow throughout their professional career. There was a time when real estate transactions in Illinois were easy to do. Not today, not in this climate of heightened scrutiny of Chicago residential and commercial real estate transactions. Today it is essential that you hire an accomplished, experienced, professional Lake County real estate lawyer to represent you in your transaction. This will save you the aggravation of dealing with a disaster before it’s too late.

Question #2: Do you practice residential and/or commercial real estate law?

Real estate encompasses a broad category of transactions. Just because a lawyer tells you that they have done residential closings, does not mean they are qualified to handle complex condominium conversions, and so forth. As such, it is critical that you hire a Chicago commercial property lawyer that specializes in the type of real estate transaction you are dealing with. If you are simply closing on a townhouse or are a first time home buyer, than a Chicago real estate lawyer who handles residential closings is all you need. But if you are engaged in higher end commercial property transactions, you need an Illinois commercial property lawyer to best represent your interests.

Question #3: Who will be handling your case?

You want to ensure that the person you hire is the person you want to work on your case. As mentioned above, Chicago real estate transactions can become very time consuming and burdensome. You will probably talk to your attorney on a daily basis, sometimes more than once per day. And when the negotiations are in full gear, you will really be spending time with your chosen counselor. As such, make sure you like and trust your attorney. Make sure the attorney you choose will be handling your case himself as opposed to shuffling it off to a young associate to “bill-up.” Make sure you trust your attorney. Hiring an attorney you can work with efficiently and effectively can make all the difference in determining whether your real estate transaction is a success.


Disclaimer

This blog is for entertainment and informational purposes only. It is not intended as legal advice and the accuracy thereof is not warranted or guaranteed. This information is prone to errors and omissions. Use this information at your own risk. Reading this blog does not create an attorney-client relationship. All content in this blog is owned by the creator. This blog may include copyrighted information. Use of this information constitutes a “fair use” of this material.

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