Who Pays Medical Bills After a Dog Bite?

Medical bills from a dog attack can be huge. Though the vast majority of injuries are superficial scrapes that require minimal medical attention.

If you are injured in a dog attack you may wonder who pays for the medical bills.

First and foremost, use your health insurance to pay your medical bills. If you have health insurance, it is likely that your policy will cover most of your medical expenses.

You may have co-payments and other out of your pocket expenses for gauze or ointments for example. These costs can be part of your settlement so keep the receipts.

Beware though that your health insurance company will likely send you a letter asking if your injuries were caused by a ‘third party.’ Make sure you respond to that letter.

You will likely then receive a health insurance lien in the mail confirming that the insurance company expects to be reimbursed for the money they paid out on your behalf for your medical expenses.

This is one of the reasons why it’s important to consult with an attorney after a dog attack.

dog bite payout stats

Will the Dog Bite Owner Pay for My Medical Expenses?

If the dog owner has homeowners’ or renters’ insurance, chances are that their insurance company will ultimately compensate you for your medical bills and pain and suffering.

But what if they don’t have insurance. That is an entirely different issue. Then you are going to go to have to go after the dog owner directly for your expenses.

You’ll then have to decide whether it’s worth filing a lawsuit and going after the dog owner individually for compensation.

Filing an Insurance Claim After a Dog Bite

If there is insurance, you’re going to file a claim with the insurance company. Look for the State Farm (or whatever company) customer support number on Google and call it.

We of course recommend speaking with an experienced Chicago dog bite attorney before you call for many reasons. The most important being that when you call they may ask you for a recorded statement to document what happened in the incident. If you aren’t prepped for this call by an attorney, you may say something that hurts your case later.

One reason attorneys are eager to get involved in dog bite cases because if there homeowner’s insurance, then it is likely that the policy is a good size. Most policies we’ve seen are $250,000 and bigger.

Conversely, a renter’s policy could provide as little as $10,000 in coverage.

What Kinds of Losses Can You Recover in a Dog Bite Claim?

You may be wondering exactly what kinds of damages you can pursue in your dog bite claim. Under Illinois Law, people who are hurt by dogs and in other kinds of accidents can pursue compensation for both their economic and non-economic losses. Some of the losses that dog bite victims often successfully seek include:

  • Medical expenses
  • Lost income
  • Property damage
  • Physical and emotional pain and suffering
  • Permanent disfigurement

It’s important to note that future losses should be included in any settlement you accept. In some cases, determining these future damages may require the assistance of financial or medical experts. As a result, it’s critical that anyone seriously injured by a dog attack retain an attorney with the experience and resources required to effectively handle their claim,

Call Us Today to Schedule a Free Consultation with a Chicago Dog Bite Lawyer

If you or a loved one have been attacked and injured by a dog, you need legal help to make sure that your interests are protected. Call the dog bite lawyers at the Chicago Legal Group today at 1-847-305-4105 to schedule your free consultation.

Have more questions? Download our FREE Top 7 Illinois Dog Bite Law Tips PDF document today.

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    The information on this site is not intended to be legal advice. Consult with an attorney for legal advice. Reading and visiting this site does not create an attorney-client relationship nor does sending an email to any of the attorneys listed on this site. An attorney-client relationship will only be made upon the appropriate consent of both you and the attorney.

    The information on this site is not intended to be legal advice. Consult with an attorney for legal advice. Reading and visiting this site does not create an attorney-client relationship nor does sending an email to any of the attorneys listed on this site. An attorney-client relationship will only be made upon the appropriate consent of both you and the attorney.